fbpx

Tag: Italian Culture

Celebrating International Women’s Day in Italy: la Festa della Donna
Post

Celebrating International Women’s Day in Italy: la Festa della Donna

As March approaches, Italians around the world gear up to celebrate International Women's Day, or as it's known in Italy, the Festa della Donna. This significant day, observed annually on March 8th, holds deep cultural roots and serves as a poignant reminder of the ongoing struggle for gender equality and women's rights.

All you need to know about coffee
Post

All you need to know about coffee

“Shall we have a coffee?” in Italian: “Vuoi un caffe’?” A simple question that encompasses the desire to be together, to confide in one another, to relax, a break during work! The place can be “il bar” or simply at home! This is the first question that an Italian will ask you when welcoming you into his house, right after greeting you!

Understanding the Italian Flag: Colors, History, and Symbolism
Post

Understanding the Italian Flag: Colors, History, and Symbolism

Italy's national flag, with its iconic tricolor design, is more than just a symbol of the nation; it's a representation of Italy's rich history, unity, and cultural identity. Let's delve into the fascinating story behind the Italian flag – its colors, history, and the profound symbolism it carries.

The Italian days of Giorni della Merla
Post

The Italian days of Giorni della Merla

Italy, a country steeped in rich culture and captivating traditions, harbors a lesser-known yet fascinating custom: the Giorni della Merla. Translating to "the days of the blackbird," this tradition carries a historical and meteorological essence that continues to intrigue locals and visitors alike.

Tuscan Dialects: The Other Italian Language Brothers
Post

Tuscan Dialects: The Other Italian Language Brothers

Italy, a land renowned for its rich history, breathtaking landscapes, and, of course, its diverse culinary delights, is also a treasure trove of linguistic diversity. While Italian stands as the country’s official language, a myriad of regional dialects peppers the linguistic landscape. Among these, the Tuscan dialects shine as remarkable linguistic siblings to the standard Italian language.

Italian Opera Origin
Post

Italian Opera Origin

Italian opera is a genre of vocal music that has its origins in the 18th century. Its origins can be traced back to the culture and society of the time, specifically the desire to create a national art form that represented Italy. The first example of Italian opera is considered to be “Dafne” by Jacopo Peri in 1598, but it was with Claudio Monteverdi’s “Orfeo” in 1607 that Italian opera began to develop as a distinct genre.

Unlocking the Enigma of Commedia dell’Arte: A Theatrical Journey
Post

Unlocking the Enigma of Commedia dell’Arte: A Theatrical Journey

Between the beginning of the 15th century and the end of the 16th century, one of the most important artistic and intellectual movements in all of European history developed in Italy and Europe: the Renaissance. The latter, having its roots in Humanism, represents a complex and dynamic historical moment that effectively marked the transition between the Middle Ages and the Modern Era.

In Bocca al Lupo origins of the Famous Expression
Post

In Bocca al Lupo origins of the Famous Expression

If you've been hanging out with Italians, chances are you might have felt confused hearing the sentence 'In bocca al lupo!' thrown with enthusiasm among the other things they say at the end of a gathering. Literally meaning 'in the mouth of the wolf!', this popular colloquialism is just another way of wishing good luck to someone who is about to step into something new that might present a challenge—be it an exam, the beginning of a new job or project, or an adventurous trip.

Epifania
Post

Epifania

This famous quote synthetizes the whole period of Festivity Season, or Christmas Holidays – Feste di Natale e Nuovo Anno- for Italians. The holidays, which are public holidays for school students starting around from 23 December and ending on 8th January depending on the Italian region, include religious and lay festivities, like Christmas’ Eve (Vigilia di Natale) and Christmas (Natale) itself, Santo Stefano (Box Day), New Year’s Eve (San Silvestro, 31st December, or Vigilia di Capodanno), and New Year, or Capodanno (the Head/Start of the Year). A very happy period for Italian children, not going to school, and enjoying family, games, presents and food with their families!

Wine an Italian Passion
Post

Wine an Italian Passion

Wine represents a very important but also an indispensable component in the Italian cultural and social tradition. Wine occupies a fortunate place in Italian gastronomy, no wonder, since long ago vines found here the ideal conditions and for this reason the Greeks called this territory “Enotria – Terra del Vino” (Enotria – Land of wine), a
sign that the vine and the production of wine were already well present in Italy since the times of Greek colonization.

Who invented pasta
Post

Who invented pasta

Let's set the record straight from the beginning: the invention of pasta cannot be credited to the Chinese, and it did not find its way to Italians through Marco Polo. Instead, its origins can be traced back to Arab Sicily, from where it gradually spread throughout Italy, making notable stops in Naples and Genoa. This is the intriguing tale behind the dish that symbolizes Italian cuisine.